The MOMA needs to get into this century

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Last week, I received in the mail, a large heavy envelope from the Museum of Modern Art.  My first thought was who ordered something from the MOMA? 

Inside was a monthly appointment calendar, put out by the MOMA, with each month next to a piece of art owned by the MOMA.  Since there wasn't even a card inside the mailing, I am assuming that because we are members, that this is the annual "thank you". 

The MOMA, which just re-opened a few years back to fantastic new building and consistently puts on wonderfully curated exhibits, should figure out how to get into this century.  The website has always been sub-par.  Regardless of a poor website, I'd be interested, as a donor, how much money they spent on sending out the calendars.  The MOMA store sells the calendars for $16.95 and I am going to guess and say with shipping and tax, that would come to about $20-21. Give that a single membership is $75 for the year, $120 for a duel and $150 for a family and they just gave back $21 to me doesn't make any sense. 

Money is not flowing like water these days for organizations that count on private funding to operate.  Not only is it beyond poor skills from the Development department to not send some type of note inside the mailing, I have not used a paper calendar in years.  Does anyone in the MOMA notice that the majority of people these days are using some type of device, be it a Blackberry or IPhone to keep their calendars. 

It is wasn't for the fact that I want to support the arts, particularly the MOMA, as I do go there more than a handful of times over the course of the year,  I'd consider not supporting them this year on principle.  The business as usual out of their Development office is a disgrace by sending out a calendar instead of coming up with a clever way to thank their donors while keeping in mind that it is almost 2010.  Times are hard and I would be shocked if the MOMA wasn't having the same financial difficulties as other institutions depending on private funding.  My bet is that even as times get better, we will not see people going back to the days when no thought was given to a philanthropic gesture. 

Big organizations, in the arts, need to be leaders in the non-profit world not only when it comes to exhibits.
If we don't see leadership from the big guys, who is going to be the leader of change in this arena?